Norwegian University of Science and Technology

The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, commonly known as NTNU, is located in Trondheim. NTNU is the second largest of the eight universities in Norway, and, as its name suggests, has the main national responsibility for higher education in engineering and technology. In addition to engineering and the natural and physical sciences, the university offers advanced degrees in other academic disciplines ranging from the social sciences, the arts, medicine, architecture and fine art.

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

From dried cod to tissue sample preservation

Could human tissue samples be dried for storage, instead of being frozen? Researchers are looking at the salt cod industry for a potential tissue sample drying technology that could save money without sacrificing tissue quality.

Nov 19, 2014
not rated yet 0

The secret life of the sea trout

Jan G. Davidsen and his graduate students are spies. They use listening stations and special tags they attach to their subjects to track their movements. They follow their subjects winter and summer, day ...

Oct 29, 2014
not rated yet 0

Cheaper silicon means cheaper solar cells

Researchers at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology have pioneered a new approach to manufacturing solar cells that requires less silicon and can accommodate silicon with more impurities than ...

Oct 22, 2014
4.8 / 5 (9) 1

Turning humble seaweed into biofuel

The sea has long been a source of Norway's riches, whether from cod, farmed salmon or oil. Now one researcher from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) researcher hopes to add seaweed ...

Oct 16, 2014
4 / 5 (5) 5

Sharks contain more pollutants than polar bears

The polar bear is known for having alarmingly high concentrations of PCB and other pollutants. But researchers have discovered that Greenland sharks store even more of these contaminants in their bodies.

Apr 15, 2014
not rated yet 0

Serengeti's animals under pressure

Tanzania has one of the fastest growing human populations in the world, and the number of conflicts between humans and other species is expected to rise as pressure on land areas grows.

Dec 11, 2013
not rated yet 0

Learning from algae sex

Researchers at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) are delving into the mysterious world of algae to find better ways to put these organisms to use.

Nov 06, 2013
2 / 5 (4) 0