NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) was founded in 1959 at Greenbelt, Maryland. It launched its first weather satellite SIROS in 1960. GSFC at Greenbelt has 1121 acres for its 50 facilities. The Wallops Island facility is 6188 acres with 84 major buildings. GSPC at Greenbelt is most noted for its Diffraction Grafting Evaluation Facility, Earth Observing and System Data and Information System, Flight Dynamic Facility, High Capacity Centrifuge, Hubble Space Telescope Control Center and an Integrated Mission Design Center. GSFC welcomes inquires from the media and the public. Image use requests are made via -e-mail. Requests for information need to have the specific purpose of the inquiry in the subject line, otherwise, blank subject inquiries will be answered last.

Address
Mail Code 130, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 USA
E-mail
gsfc-media@mail.nasa.gov
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dateAug 10, 2015 in Earth Sciences
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dateJun 25, 2015 in Space Exploration
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Terra captures Alaskan wildfires

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dateAug 10, 2015 in Earth Sciences
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NASA's GPM sees dry air affecting Typhoon Halola

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dateJul 24, 2015 in Earth Sciences
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