Massey University

For male weta, big is better

(PhysOrg.com) -- For a male tree weta, size really is everything. In six of the seven species in New Zealand the males all sport a distinctly large head, and the bigger the head, the better the chance of mating.

Nov 18, 2011
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Class size matters to those who struggle most

Research shows that class size does matter; and that it matters most for socio-economically disadvantaged learners, the very groups that the Government says it is most concerned about, says Massey University Professor of ...

Feb 03, 2012
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Boaters need to be mindful of dolphins

Boaties heading out into the Hauraki Gulf over the summer need to take greater care in sharing the water, Massey researchers say, as they uncover the impact of collisions between vessels and marine mammals ...

Jan 31, 2014
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Marine reserves havens for large snapper

The new study led by scientists from Massey University's Coastal-Marine Research Group (CMRG) has estimated the effects of three Hauraki Gulf marine reserves on snapper, by comparing numbers of fish inside ...

Apr 01, 2014
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The flight of the frisky tui

New Zealand's endemic tui (Prosthemadera novaseelandiae) have a tendency to 'jump the fence' when looking to breed, a study by Massey University researcher Dr Sarah Wells shows.

Nov 12, 2014
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Young people overly optimistic about finances

A new survey of young New Zealanders by the Westpac-Massey Fin-Ed Centre shows that many believe their financial situation will improve in the coming year and their money management skills require no improvement.

Jan 23, 2015
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Bi-annual bat birthing helps Ebola persist

A bat-filled tree has been touted as the source of the on-going Ebola epidemic in Western Africa – now research from Massey University suggests that the twice yearly birthing of bats may also be responsible ...

Feb 11, 2015
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Gaming machines affecting well-being

(PhysOrg.com) -- Electronic gaming machines have a detrimental impact upon the lives of those who use them and their associates, according to new research.

Dec 22, 2008
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