Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Flipping the 'off' switch on cell growth

A protein known for turning on genes to help cells survive low-oxygen conditions also slows down the copying of new DNA strands, thus shutting down the growth of new cells, Johns Hopkins researchers report. Their discovery ...

Feb 22, 2013
4 / 5 (9) 5 | with audio podcast

Giving transplanted cells a nanotech checkup

Researchers at Johns Hopkins have devised a way to detect whether cells previously transplanted into a living animal are alive or dead, an innovation they say is likely to speed the development of cell replacement ...

Feb 05, 2013
4.7 / 5 (3) 0 | with audio podcast

Rare form of active 'jumping genes' found in mammals

Much of the DNA that makes up our genomes can be traced back to strange rogue sequences known as transposable elements, or jumping genes, which are largely idle in mammals. But Johns Hopkins researchers report they have identified ...

Jan 03, 2013
5 / 5 (2) 0 | with audio podcast

What's Feeding Cancer Cells?

Cancer cells need a lot of nutrients to multiply and survive. While much is understood about how cancer cells use blood sugar to make energy, not much is known about how they get other nutrients. Now, researchers at the Johns ...

Feb 16, 2009
4.5 / 5 (4) 3