John Innes Centre

The John Innes Centre (JIC) located in Norwich, Norfolk, England is an independent centre for research and training in plant and microbial science. It is a registered charity (No 223852) grant-aided by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and is a member of the Norwich Research Park. The John Innes Horticultural Institution was founded in 1910 at Merton Park, Surrey (now London Borough of Merton), with funds bequeathed by John Innes, a merchant and philanthropist. The Institution occupied Innes's former estate at Merton Park until 1945 when it moved to Bayfordbury, Hertfordshire. It moved to its present site in 1967. John Innes Compost was developed by the institution in the 1930s. In the 1980s, the administration of the John Innes Institute was combined with that of the Plant Breeding Institute and the Nitrogen Fixation Laboratory. In 1994, following the relocation of the operations of other two organisations to the Norwich site, the three were merged as the John Innes Centre.

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The fine tuning of flowering time

Scientists at the John Innes Centre are decoding the role of non-coding RNA. They are starting to uncover its impact on regulating gene expression, with their focus on a gene that regulates flowering time.

Apr 28, 2014 not rated yet 0

How plants become zombies

(Phys.org) —Forget popular video game Plants Vs. Zombies, some plants are zombies and scientists have uncovered how bacterial parasites turn them into the living dead.

Apr 09, 2014 4.8 / 5 (10) 0

GM spuds beat blight

(Phys.org) —In a three-year GM research trial, scientists boosted resistance of potatoes to late blight, their most important disease, without deploying fungicides.

Feb 17, 2014 not rated yet 1

Climate-resilient wheat

JIC scientists have discovered that changing temperatures can have a big effect on resistance to yellow rust, one of the most serious diseases of wheat.

Jan 20, 2014 5 / 5 (1) 0