European Space Agency

The European Space Agency (ESA) is an international organization with 18 member states headquartered in Paris, France with the purpose of combining talent, resources and funds to undertake space programs, study Earth, the Solar System and the Universe. The annual budget for ESA is over $3.5 billion. The primary member states are Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. In addition, Canada, Hungary, Romania operate under a cooperative agreement. Estonia and Slovenia have recently entered into a cooperative agreement.

Address
8-10 rue Mario Nikis 75738 Paris Cedex 15
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ESA image: London nightlife

ESA astronaut Tim Peake took this image of London, UK, from the International Space Station 400 km above Earth. At the time it was midnight in the capital city and, because the Space Station runs on Greenwich Mean Time, it ...

dateFeb 03, 2016 in Space Exploration
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ESA image: Martian labyrinth

This block of martian terrain, etched with an intricate pattern of landslides and wind-blown dunes, is a small segment of a vast labyrinth of valleys, fractures and plateaus.

dateJan 29, 2016 in Space Exploration
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Ariane 5's first launch of 2016

An Ariane 5 last night delivered telecom satellite Intelsat-29e into its planned orbit. Liftoff of Ariane flight VA228 occurred on 27 January at 23:20 GMT (20:20 local time, 00:20 CET on 28 January) from Europe's Spaceport ...

dateJan 28, 2016 in Space Exploration
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ESA image: Inside a rocket's belly

An unusual view of a spacecraft – looking from below, directly into the thruster nozzles. This is a test version of ESA's service module for NASA's Orion spacecraft that will send astronauts further into space than ever ...

dateJan 27, 2016 in Space Exploration
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Integral X-rays Earth's aurora

Normally busy with observing high-energy black holes, supernovas and neutron stars, ESA's Integral space observatory recently had the chance to look back at our own planet's aurora.

dateJan 26, 2016 in Space Exploration
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