Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, (CSHL) traces its roots to 1890. It is presently located in Suffolk County, Long Island, New York. The private, not for profit lab scientists from the Carnegie Institution of Department of Genetics have made significant contributions in the study and treatment of genetics and medicine. Recently, The Watson School of Biological Sciences was established which employs 400 scientists. CSHL has an educational and research component. CSHL has eight Nobel Laureates who have been associated with the lab. Many break-through discoveries have been made at CSHL. Among the discoveries is the work by John D. Watson who co-discovered the double helix structure of DNA with Francis Crick. Robert J. Roberts received the Nobel Prize for the co-discovery of introns and RNA splicing. CSHL requires all inquiries from the media and public go through Mr. Tarr, e-mail provided.

One Bungtown Road Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724 516-367-8800
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Novel mouse model of demyelinating disorder

In the February 1st issue of G&D, Dr. Brian Popko (The University of Chicago) and colleagues describe how mutation of a gene called ZFP191 leads to disordered CNS myelination in mice -- reminiscent of what is seen in human ...

dateJan 14, 2010 in Medical research
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MicroRNA-mediated metastasis suppression

Metastases are responsible for over 90% of cancer deaths. In the upcoming issue of G&D, Dr. Robert Weinberg (MIT) and colleagues lend molecular insight into how microRNAs suppress tumor metastasis.

dateOct 28, 2009 in Cancer
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New insight into human ciliopathy

In the September 1st issue of G&D, Dr. Karen Oegema (UCSD) and colleagues identify the molecular basis of the lethal developmental disorder, hydrolethalus syndrome, and reveal that hydrolethalus syndrome actually belongs ...

dateAug 04, 2009 in Genetics
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Targeting MMPs to halt advanced metastatic breast cancer

An upcoming G&D paper reveals how two specific matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) proteins contribute to bone metastasis in advanced breast cancer - lending important new insight into the design of clinically useful small molecule ...

dateJul 16, 2009 in Cancer
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