Chandra X-ray Center

The Chandra X-ray Center operates under the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and is housed in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The initial Chandra Observatory projects included the Hubble Space Telescope launch in 1991. The Chandra X-ray Observatory satellite launched in 1999. Chandra advanced the entire field of astronomy and in particular X-ray astronomy. The Chandra X-ray Center monitors the Chandra satellite and has answered many scientific inquiries about supernovas, black holes, neutron stars and how these anomalies behave. Observations of pressure waves and shock waves around black holes, the Milky Way, galaxies, quasars and more. The Chandra X-ray Center shares information with interested scientists and other observatories. Media inquiries are welcome and timely updates of Chandra activity is posted on their Web site.

Address
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Chandra X-ray Center, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA
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Mysterious X-ray signal intrigues astronomers

(Phys.org) —A mysterious X-ray signal has been found in a detailed study of galaxy clusters using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and ESA's XMM-Newton. One intriguing possibility is that the X-rays are produced by the ...

dateJun 24, 2014 in Astronomy
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Hardy star survives supernova blast

(Phys.org) —When a massive star runs out fuel, it collapses and explodes as a supernova. Although these explosions are extremely powerful, it is possible for a companion star to endure the blast. A team of astronomers using ...

dateMar 20, 2014 in Astronomy
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Eta Carinae: Our Neighboring Superstars

(Phys.org) —The Eta Carinae star system does not lack for superlatives. Not only does it contain one of the biggest and brightest stars in our galaxy, weighing at least 90 times the mass of the Sun, it is also extremely ...

dateAug 26, 2014 in Astronomy
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Image: Chandra's view of the Tycho Supernova remnant

More than four centuries after Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe first observed the supernova that bears his name, the supernova remnant it created is now a bright source of X-rays. The supersonic expansion of the exploded star ...

dateJul 25, 2014 in Astronomy
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Chandra celebrates the International Year of Light

The year of 2015 has been declared the International Year of Light (IYL) by the United Nations. Organizations, institutions, and individuals involved in the science and applications of light will be joining together for this ...

dateJan 23, 2015 in Astronomy
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A hidden population of exotic neutron stars

(Phys.org) —Magnetars – the dense remains of dead stars that erupt sporadically with bursts of high-energy radiation - are some of the most extreme objects known in the Universe. A major campaign using NASA's Chandra ...

dateMay 23, 2013 in Astronomy
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