Chandra X-ray Center

The Chandra X-ray Center operates under the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and is housed in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The initial Chandra Observatory projects included the Hubble Space Telescope launch in 1991. The Chandra X-ray Observatory satellite launched in 1999. Chandra advanced the entire field of astronomy and in particular X-ray astronomy. The Chandra X-ray Center monitors the Chandra satellite and has answered many scientific inquiries about supernovas, black holes, neutron stars and how these anomalies behave. Observations of pressure waves and shock waves around black holes, the Milky Way, galaxies, quasars and more. The Chandra X-ray Center shares information with interested scientists and other observatories. Media inquiries are welcome and timely updates of Chandra activity is posted on their Web site.

Address
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Chandra X-ray Center,
60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA
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Dark matter is darker than once thought

This panel of images represents a study of 72 colliding galaxy clusters conducted by a team of astronomers using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and Hubble Space Telescope. The research sets new limits on ...

dateMar 27, 2015 in Astronomy
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"Mini supernova" explosion could have big impact

In Hollywood blockbusters, explosions are often among the stars of the show. In space, explosions of actual stars are a focus for scientists who hope to better understand their births, lives, and deaths and ...

dateMar 16, 2015 in Astronomy
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Exploded star blooms like a cosmic flower

Because the debris fields of exploded stars, known as supernova remnants, are very hot, energetic, and glow brightly in X-ray light, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has proven to be a valuable tool in studying ...

dateFeb 12, 2015 in Astronomy
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Two spiral galaxies in the process of merging

At this time of year, there are lots of gatherings often decorated with festive lights. When galaxies get together, there is the chance of a spectacular light show as is the case with NGC 2207 and IC 2163

dateDec 12, 2014 in Astronomy
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Eta Carinae: Our Neighboring Superstars

(Phys.org) —The Eta Carinae star system does not lack for superlatives. Not only does it contain one of the biggest and brightest stars in our galaxy, weighing at least 90 times the mass of the Sun, it ...

dateAug 26, 2014 in Astronomy
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Mysterious X-ray signal intrigues astronomers

(Phys.org) —A mysterious X-ray signal has been found in a detailed study of galaxy clusters using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and ESA's XMM-Newton. One intriguing possibility is that the X-rays are ...

dateJun 24, 2014 in Astronomy
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Chandra captures galaxy sparkling in X-rays

(Phys.org) —Nearly a million seconds of observing time with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has revealed a spiral galaxy similar to the Milky Way glittering with hundreds of X-ray points of light.

dateJun 03, 2014 in Astronomy
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