Chandra X-ray Center

The Chandra X-ray Center operates under the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and is housed in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The initial Chandra Observatory projects included the Hubble Space Telescope launch in 1991. The Chandra X-ray Observatory satellite launched in 1999. Chandra advanced the entire field of astronomy and in particular X-ray astronomy. The Chandra X-ray Center monitors the Chandra satellite and has answered many scientific inquiries about supernovas, black holes, neutron stars and how these anomalies behave. Observations of pressure waves and shock waves around black holes, the Milky Way, galaxies, quasars and more. The Chandra X-ray Center shares information with interested scientists and other observatories. Media inquiries are welcome and timely updates of Chandra activity is posted on their Web site.

Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Chandra X-ray Center, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA
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NASA telescopes set limits on space-time quantum 'foam'

A team of scientists has used X-ray and gamma-ray observations of some of the most distant objects in the universe to better understand the nature of space and time. Their results set limits on the quantum nature, or "foaminess," ...

dateMay 28, 2015 in Astronomy
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Oxymoronic black hole RGG 118 provides clues to growth

Astronomers using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the 6.5-meter Clay Telescope in Chile have identified the smallest supermassive black hole ever detected in the center of a galaxy, as described in our latest press release. ...

dateAug 12, 2015 in Astronomy
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Pulsar punches hole in stellar disk

A fast-moving pulsar appears to have punched a hole in a disk of gas around its companion star and launched a fragment of the disk outward at a speed of about 4 million miles per hour. NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory is ...

dateJul 22, 2015 in Astronomy
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White dwarf may have shredded passing planet

The destruction of a planet may sound like the stuff of science fiction, but a team of astronomers has found evidence that this may have happened in an ancient cluster of stars at the edge of the Milky Way galaxy.

dateApr 17, 2015 in Astronomy
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"Mini supernova" explosion could have big impact

In Hollywood blockbusters, explosions are often among the stars of the show. In space, explosions of actual stars are a focus for scientists who hope to better understand their births, lives, and deaths and how they interact ...

dateMar 16, 2015 in Astronomy
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