Chalmers University of Technology

Chalmers University of Technology (Swedish: Chalmers tekniska högskola, often shortened to Chalmers), is a Swedish university located in Gothenburg that focuses on research and education in technology, natural science and architecture. The University was founded in 1829 following a donation by William Chalmers (1748–1811), a director of the Swedish East India Company, whose ships sailed across the world to supply Europe with goods from the East. He donated some of his fortune for the establishment of an "industrial school". Chalmers was run as a private institution until 1937, when the institute became a state-owned university. In 1994, the school once again became a private institution, owned by a foundation. Chalmers is one of only three universities in Sweden which are named after a person, the other two being Karolinska Institutet and Linnaeus University. On 1 January 2005, the old schools were replaced by new departments: In addition to these, Chalmers is home to six national competence centres in key fields like Mathematical Modelling, Environmental Science and Vehicle Safety (SAFER). Approximately 40% of Sweden's graduate engineers and architects are educated at Chalmers.

Address
Gothenburg, Västra Götaland County, Sweden
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Avoid work pain by using computer models of humans

Most of us suffer from work related pain at some time. It is estimated that 70% of the working population are affected by problems with muscles or the skeleton in the Western World. Ali Keyvani wants to improve the health ...

dateDec 02, 2014 in Engineering
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Free-floating planets may be born free

Tiny, round, cold clouds in space have all the right characteristics to form planets with no parent star. New observations, made with Chalmers University of Technology telescopes, show that not all free-floating planets were ...

dateAug 19, 2013 in Astronomy
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Graphene provides efficient electronics cooling

A layer of graphene can reduce the working temperature in hotspots inside a processor by up to 25 percent – which can significantly extend the working life of computers and other electronics. An international group of researchers, ...

dateJul 03, 2013 in Nanophysics
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