Carnegie Institution for Science

How algae could save plants from themselves

Algae may hold the key to feeding the world's burgeoning population. Don't worry; no one is going to make you eat them. But because they are more efficient than most plants at taking in carbon dioxide from the air, algae ...

dateMay 10, 2016 in Biotechnology
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New tool refines exoplanet search

Planet-hunting is an ongoing process that's resulting in the discovery of more and more planets orbiting distant stars. But as the hunters learn more about the variety among the tremendous number of predicted planets out ...

dateApr 11, 2016 in Astronomy
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Greenhouse gas 'bookkeeping' turned on its head

For the first time scientists have looked at the net balance of the three major greenhouse gases—carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide—for every region of Earth's landmasses. They found surprisingly, that human-induced ...

dateMar 09, 2016 in Environment
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Some bacterial CRISPRs can snip RNA, too

You've probably seen news stories about the highly lauded, much-discussed genome editing system CRISPR/Cas9. But did you know the system was actually derived from bacteria, which use it to fight off foreign invaders such ...

dateMar 03, 2016 in Cell & Microbiology
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Making sense of metallic glass

If you freeze any liquid fast enough, even liquid metal, it becomes a glass. Vitrified metals, or metallic glasses, are at the frontier of materials science research. They have been made by rapidly cooling alloys of various ...

dateFeb 08, 2016 in Condensed Matter
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