Carnegie Institution for Science

Studying photosynthesis, from outer space

Plants convert energy from sunlight into chemical energy during a process called photosynthesis. This energy is passed on to humans and animals that eat the plants, and thus photosynthesis is the primary source of energy ...

dateMar 24, 2014 in Environment
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Nearby failed stars may harbor planet

(Phys.org) —Astronomers, including Carnegie's Yuri Beletsky, took precise measurements of the closest pair of failed stars to the Sun, which suggest that the system harbors a third, planetary-mass object.The research is ...

dateDec 16, 2013 in Astronomy
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Dense hydrogen in a new light

(Phys.org) —Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe. The way it responds under extreme pressures and temperatures is crucial to our understanding of matter and the nature of hydrogen-rich planets.

dateJun 03, 2013 in Condensed Matter
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Magnesium oxide: From Earth to super-Earth

The mantles of Earth and other rocky planets are rich in magnesium and oxygen. Due to its simplicity, the mineral magnesium oxide is a good model for studying the nature of planetary interiors. New work from a team led by ...

dateNov 22, 2012 in Earth Sciences
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Coral growth rate plummets in 30-year comparison

A team of researchers working on a Carnegie expedition in Australia's Great Barrier Reef has documented that coral growth rates have plummeted 40% since the mid-1970s. The scientists suggest that ocean acidification may be ...

dateSep 17, 2014 in Environment
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First meteorite linked to Martian crust

After extensive analyses by a team of scientists led by Carl Agee at the University of New Mexico, researchers have identified a new class of Martian meteorite that likely originated from the Mars's crust. It is also the ...

dateJan 03, 2013 in Space Exploration
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Ancient minerals: Which gave rise to life?

Life originated as a result of natural processes that exploited early Earth's raw materials. Scientific models of life's origins almost always look to minerals for such essential tasks as the synthesis of life's molecular ...

dateNov 25, 2013 in Earth Sciences
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Carnegie hosts crater-naming contest

The MESSENGER Education and Public Outreach (EPO) Team is launching a competition this week to name five impact craters on Mercury. The contest is open to all Earthlings, except for members of the mission's EPO team. The ...

dateDec 16, 2014 in Space Exploration
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