Carnegie Institution for Science

Carnegie Institution for Science (CIW) was founded in 1902. Until 2007 it was known as the Carnegie Institution. The purpose of the institution is to support in the broadest sense scientific inquiry for the good of humanity. Carnegie grants include observatories and the Hale Telescope on Mount Wilson. Carnegie grants to Nobel Laureates Barbara McClintock, Alfred Hershey and Andrew Fire for their work on genetics continues. Carnegie Institution for Science divides its endeavors into the following departments; Embryology, Geophysical lab, Global Ecology, Observatories, Plant Biology and Terrestrial Magnetism. Carnegie publishes news stories, reports and a variety of scientific publications and books. The Carnegie Institution for Science is a private independent research organization that supports scientific research.

1530 P Street NW • Washington, DC 20005, USA
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How algae could save plants from themselves

Algae may hold the key to feeding the world's burgeoning population. Don't worry; no one is going to make you eat them. But because they are more efficient than most plants at taking in carbon dioxide from the air, algae ...

dateMay 10, 2016 in Biotechnology
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New tool refines exoplanet search

Planet-hunting is an ongoing process that's resulting in the discovery of more and more planets orbiting distant stars. But as the hunters learn more about the variety among the tremendous number of predicted planets out ...

dateApr 11, 2016 in Astronomy
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Greenhouse gas 'bookkeeping' turned on its head

For the first time scientists have looked at the net balance of the three major greenhouse gases—carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide—for every region of Earth's landmasses. They found surprisingly, that human-induced ...

dateMar 09, 2016 in Environment
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Mercury's mysterious 'darkness' revealed

Scientists have long been puzzled about what makes Mercury's surface so dark. The innermost planet reflects much less sunlight than the Moon, a body on which surface darkness is controlled by the abundance of iron-rich minerals. ...

dateMar 07, 2016 in Space Exploration
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