Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

The Broad Institute is a genomic medicine research center located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States. Although it is independently governed and supported as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit research organization, the institute is formally affiliated with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Harvard University and its affiliated hospitals. The faculty and staff of the Broad Institute include physicians, geneticists, and molecular, chemical, and computational biologists.

Address
Broad Institute scientists and administrators are currently located in three buildings: 7 Cambridge Center, 5 Cambridge Center and 320 Charles Street in Cambridge, MA.
E-mail
news@broadinstitute.org
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Structure of key CRISPR complex revealed

Researchers from the Broad Institute and MIT have teamed up with colleagues from the University of Tokyo to form the first high definition picture of the Cas9 complex – a key part of the CRISPR-Cas system used by scientists ...

Feb 13, 2014 4.5 / 5 (6) 0 | with audio podcast

Single-cell sequencing

When studying any kind of population—people or cells—averaging is a useful, if flawed, form of measurement. According to the US Census Bureau, the average American household size in 2010 was 2.59. Of ...

May 22, 2013 not rated yet 0

Functional genomics gets tiny

A little more than a decade ago, researchers discovered an ancient mechanism that cells use to silence genes. Like a dimmer switch turning down a light, RNA interference (RNAi) dials down gene activity in ...

May 17, 2012 5 / 5 (1) 0

First lizard genome sequenced

(PhysOrg.com) -- The green anole lizard is an agile and active creature, and so are elements of its genome. This genomic agility and other new clues have emerged from the full sequencing of the lizard's genome ...

Aug 31, 2011 5 / 5 (3) 2 | with audio podcast

Cracking open a cell biology mystery

Two billion years ago somewhere in the primordial soup, one of our single-cell ancestors made a quick lunch out of another. But, in a moment of evolutionary serendipity, the would-be prey worked out a "win-win" symbiotic ...

Aug 09, 2010 5 / 5 (6) 8 | with audio podcast