BioMed Central

BioMed Central is located in the U.K. It is a science, technology and medical publisher that has pioneered the concept of open-access for peer-review research journals. BioMed publishes around 200 peer review journals for the purpose of advancing scientific communication among researchers and the public. Some examples of BioMed journals include, Journal of Biology, Bioinformatics, Malaria Journal. BioMed receives funding from the a variety of sources including reprint fees and grants from the NIH and other science related foundations. The peer-review criteria is up to the individual publisher of the journal submitted to BioMed Central.

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Getting under the shell of the turtle genome

Scientists have decoded the genome of the western painted turtle (Chrysemys picta bellii) , one of the most abundant turtles on Earth, finding clues to their longevity and ability to survive without oxygen during long winters ...

dateMar 27, 2013 in Biotechnology
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Pining for a beetle genome

The sequencing and assembly of the genome of the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae, is published online this week in Genome Biology. The species is native to North America, where it is currently wreaking havoc ...

dateMar 26, 2013 in Biotechnology
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Losing wetlands to grow crops

Getting enough to eat is a basic human need – but at what cost to the environment? Research published in BioMed Central's journal Agriculture & Food Security demonstrates that as their crops on higher ground fail due to ...

dateMar 24, 2013 in Environment
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Boys are right-handed, girls are left...

Well at least this is true for sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps) and grey short-tailed opossums (Monodelphis domestica), finds an article in BioMed Central's open access journal BMC Evolutionary Biology, and shows that handedness ...

dateMar 05, 2013 in Plants & Animals
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How much protection is enough?

Protection of marine areas from fishing increases density and biomass of fish and invertebrates (such as lobster and scallops) finds a systematic review published in BioMed Central's open access journal Environmental Evidence. ...

dateFeb 27, 2013 in Ecology
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