American Society for Microbiology

The American Society for Microbiology (ASM) is a professional organization for scientists who study viruses, bacteria, fungi, algae, and protozoa as well as other aspects of microbiology. Microbiology is the study of organisms too small to be seen with the naked eye and which must be viewed with a microscope. ASM membership includes scientists who do basic research into the nature and lives of viruses, bacteria, and other microorganisms. ASM membership also includes scientists who work in the field of applied microbiology, for example, researching cures for diseases caused by microorganisms, or the potential for microorganisms to create cheeses from milk, to generate fuels, or to clean up oil spills. ASM was founded in 1899 under the name the "Society of American Bacteriologists." In December 1960, it was renamed the "American Society for Microbiology."

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Phage spread antibiotic resistance

Investigators found that nearly half of the 50 chicken meat samples purchased from supermarkets, street markets, and butchers in Austria contained viruses that are capable of transferring antibiotic resistance genes from ...

dateMay 15, 2015 in Cell & Microbiology
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New light on bacterial microcompartments

Bacteria contain "microcompartments," which are poorly understood organelles that play critical roles in metabolism. Understanding how they work may ultimately enable engineering them for useful applications. In salmonella, ...

dateMay 12, 2015 in Biotechnology
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