American Institute of Physics

Electronic nose out in front

Chemical sensors are exceedingly good at detecting a single substance or a class of chemicals, even at highly rarified concentrations. Biological noses, however, are vastly more versatile and capable of discriminating subtle ...

May 02, 2012 5 / 5 (1) 0 | with audio podcast

Mining for heat

Underground mining is a sweaty job, and not just because of the hard work it takes to haul ore: Mining tunnels fill with heat naturally emitted from the surrounding rock. A group of researchers from McGill University in Canada ...

May 02, 2012 5 / 5 (2) 2 | with audio podcast

Malaria: Blood cells behaving badly

All the billions of flat, biconcave disks in our body known as red blood cells (or erythrocytes) make three basic, tumbling-treadmill-type motions when they wend their way through the body's bloodstream ferrying ...

Jun 10, 2014 5 / 5 (1) 0

Coffee bean acoustics

People around the world are drawn to coffee's powerful allure—for its beloved smell, and taste, and for the caffeine boost it provides. As you enjoy your coffee beverage, however, odds are good you're probably ...

May 22, 2014 4.8 / 5 (4) 1

Physicists working to cure 'dry eye' disease

The eye is an exquisitely sensitive system with many aspects that remain somewhat of a mystery—both in the laboratory and in the clinic. A U.S.-based team of mathematicians and optometrists is working to change this by ...

May 06, 2014 4.1 / 5 (8) 0

The secret of fertile sperm

To better understand the causes of male infertility, a team of Bay Area researchers is exploring the factors, both physiological and biochemical, that differentiate fertile sperm from infertile sperm. At ...

Feb 18, 2014 4 / 5 (3) 0