American Institute of Physics

New light on the 'split peak' of alcohols

For scientists probing the electronic structure of materials using a relatively new technique called resonant inelastic soft X-ray scattering (RIXS) in the last few years, a persistent question has been how ...

Oct 14, 2014
4.8 / 5 (6) 1

Low-priced plastic photovoltaics

Photovoltaic devices, which tap the power of the sun and convert it to electricity, offer a green—and potentially unlimited—alternative to fossil fuel use. So why haven't solar technologies been more ...

Oct 22, 2013
4.5 / 5 (11) 2 | with audio podcast

Water caged in buckyballs

In a new paper in the Journal of Chemical Physics, a research team in the United Kingdom and the United States describes how water molecules "caged" in fullerene spheres ("buckyballs") are providing a deep ...

May 20, 2014
4.6 / 5 (17) 0

Harvesting light, the single-molecule way

New insights into one of the molecular mechanisms behind light harvesting, the process that enables photosynthetic organisms to thrive, even as weather conditions change from full sunlight to deep cloud cover, ...

Feb 16, 2014
4.9 / 5 (10) 0

The '50-50' chip: Memory device of the future?

A new, environmentally-friendly electronic alloy consisting of 50 aluminum atoms bound to 50 atoms of antimony may be promising for building next-generation "phase-change" memory devices, which may be the ...

Sep 13, 2013
4.2 / 5 (11) 2 | with audio podcast

Designing an acoustic diode

Most people know about ultrasound through its role in prenatal imaging: those grainy, grey outlines of junior constructed from reflected sound waves. A new technology called an "acoustic diode," envisioned ...

Nov 01, 2013
4.5 / 5 (22) 0 | with audio podcast

Densest array of carbon nanotubes grown to date

Carbon nanotubes' outstanding mechanical, electrical and thermal properties make them an alluring material to electronics manufacturers. However, until recently scientists believed that growing the high density ...

Sep 20, 2013
5 / 5 (14) 0 | with audio podcast

Seeing in the dark

Thermal infrared (IR) energy is emitted from all things that have a temperature greater than absolute zero. Human eyes, primarily sensitive to shorter wavelength visible light, are unable to detect or differentiate ...

Oct 29, 2013
5 / 5 (8) 0 | with audio podcast