American Institute of Physics

Electronic nose out in front

Chemical sensors are exceedingly good at detecting a single substance or a class of chemicals, even at highly rarified concentrations. Biological noses, however, are vastly more versatile and capable of discriminating subtle ...

dateMay 02, 2012 in Nanomaterials
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Mining for heat

Underground mining is a sweaty job, and not just because of the hard work it takes to haul ore: Mining tunnels fill with heat naturally emitted from the surrounding rock. A group of researchers from McGill University in Canada ...

dateMay 02, 2012 in Energy & Green Tech
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Nanotechnology helps scientists keep silver shiny

There are thousands of silver artifacts in museum collections around the world, and keeping them shiny is a constant challenge. So scientists are using new technology to give conservators a helping hand. A team of researchers ...

dateOct 26, 2012 in Nanomaterials
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Climate control in termite mounds

When they make their way into homes, some species of termites can be destructive pests. Their fungus-harvesting relatives in Africa and Asia, however, are known for their construction prowess, collectively ...

dateNov 25, 2014 in General Physics
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Sound bullets in water

Sound waves are commonly used in applications ranging from ultrasound imaging to hyperthermia therapy, in which high temperatures are induced, for example, in tumors to destroy them. In 2010, researchers at Caltech led by ...

dateNov 19, 2012 in General Physics
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