American Institute of Physics

Electronic nose out in front

Chemical sensors are exceedingly good at detecting a single substance or a class of chemicals, even at highly rarified concentrations. Biological noses, however, are vastly more versatile and capable of discriminating subtle ...

May 02, 2012
5 / 5 (1) 0 | with audio podcast

Mining for heat

Underground mining is a sweaty job, and not just because of the hard work it takes to haul ore: Mining tunnels fill with heat naturally emitted from the surrounding rock. A group of researchers from McGill University in Canada ...

May 02, 2012
5 / 5 (2) 2 | with audio podcast

Mathematicians model heat flow in human tears

Mathematicians from the University of Delaware have created a new model of the fluid dynamics and heat flow in human tears. When people blink their eyes, a thin liquid film is spread across the surface of the eye.

Jun 05, 2012
5 / 5 (5) 2 | with audio podcast

Nanotechnology helps scientists keep silver shiny

There are thousands of silver artifacts in museum collections around the world, and keeping them shiny is a constant challenge. So scientists are using new technology to give conservators a helping hand. A team of researchers ...

Oct 26, 2012
5 / 5 (1) 0 | with audio podcast

Sound bullets in water

Sound waves are commonly used in applications ranging from ultrasound imaging to hyperthermia therapy, in which high temperatures are induced, for example, in tumors to destroy them. In 2010, researchers at Caltech led by ...

Nov 19, 2012
5 / 5 (9) 0 | with audio podcast

Coffee bean acoustics

People around the world are drawn to coffee's powerful allure—for its beloved smell, and taste, and for the caffeine boost it provides. As you enjoy your coffee beverage, however, odds are good you're probably ...

May 22, 2014
4.8 / 5 (4) 1