American Institute of Physics

Bright, laser-based lighting devices

As a modern culture, we crave artificial white lights—the brighter the better, and ideally using less energy than ever before. To meet the ever-escalating demand for more lighting in more places and to ...

Sep 27, 2013
4.7 / 5 (16) 2 | with audio podcast

Densest array of carbon nanotubes grown to date

Carbon nanotubes' outstanding mechanical, electrical and thermal properties make them an alluring material to electronics manufacturers. However, until recently scientists believed that growing the high density ...

Sep 20, 2013
5 / 5 (14) 0 | with audio podcast

New technology for bioseparation

Separating target molecules in biological samples is a critical part of diagnosing and detecting diseases. Usually the target and probe molecules are mixed and then separated in batch processes that require ...

Sep 17, 2013
5 / 5 (2) 0

To touch the microcosmos

What if you could reach through a microscope to touch and feel the microscopic structures under the lens? In a breakthrough that may usher in a new era in the exploration of the worlds that are a million ...

Sep 13, 2013
5 / 5 (8) 0 | with audio podcast

The '50-50' chip: Memory device of the future?

A new, environmentally-friendly electronic alloy consisting of 50 aluminum atoms bound to 50 atoms of antimony may be promising for building next-generation "phase-change" memory devices, which may be the ...

Sep 13, 2013
4.2 / 5 (11) 2 | with audio podcast

Growing thin films of germanium

Researchers have developed a new technique to produce thin films of germanium crystals—key components for next-generation electronic devices such as advanced large-scale integrated circuits and flexible ...

Sep 06, 2013
4.5 / 5 (10) 0 | with audio podcast

Can solar energy help save Greece?

What happens to renewable energy programs in a country that gets whacked by a full-scale debt crisis, like the one that struck Greece beginning in 2009—do the programs whither and die in the winds of austerity? And how ...

Aug 14, 2013
3.3 / 5 (3) 3 | with audio podcast

Computer model predicts red blood cell flow

Adjacent to the walls of our arterioles, capillaries, and venules—the blood vessels that make up our microcirculation—there exists a peculiar thin layer of clear plasma, devoid of red blood cells. Although it is just ...

Aug 13, 2013
5 / 5 (1) 0

Simulating flow from volcanoes and oil spills

Some time around 37,000 BCE a massive volcano erupted in the Campanian region of Italy, blanketing much of Europe with ash, stunting plant growth and possibly dooming the Neanderthals. While our prehistoric relatives had ...

Aug 12, 2013
4 / 5 (1) 0