American Institute of Biological Sciences

Conserving biodiversity could benefit the world's poor

Land areas that are a priority for wildlife conservation provide relatively high levels of ecosystem services such as pollination, water purification, food production, and climate regulation, so safeguarding them is expected ...

dateJan 12, 2012 in Ecology
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'Non-invasive' cultivar? Buyer beware

Cultivars of popular ornamental woody plants that are being sold in the United States as non-invasive are probably anything but, according to an analysis by botanical researchers published in the October issue of BioScience. Tiffan ...

dateOct 07, 2011 in Ecology
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China's plant resources need additional protections

China needs to change where it sites its nature reserves and steer people out of remote rural villages toward cities to protect its valuable but threatened wild plant resources, according to an article published in the September ...

dateSep 07, 2011 in Ecology
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Algal turf scrubbers clean water with sunlight

An article published in the June issue of BioScience describes the early scale-up stage of a new biotechnology with environmental benefits and possible commercial potential. Algal turf scrubbers are field-sized, water-treatment system ...

dateJun 01, 2011 in Biotechnology
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Managed wolf populations could restore ecosystems

Researchers writing in the February issue of BioScience propose reintroducing small, managed populations of wolves into national parks and other areas in order to restore damaged ecosystems. The populations would not be sel ...

dateFeb 01, 2010 in Ecology
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Connectivity illuminates risk of spread of crop pests, diseases

The United States is one of the most important crop production areas in the world, so its vulnerability to crop pests is a vital concern. Ten such pests are estimated to enter the country every year, and the federal government ...

dateFeb 02, 2009 in
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Aquaculture's growth seen as continuing

Aquaculture production of seafood will probably remain the most rapidly increasing food production system worldwide through 2025, according to an assessment published in the January 2009 issue of BioScience. The assessment, by Jam ...

dateJan 02, 2009 in
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