Purdue studies office building power

Jan 18, 2006

Purdue University engineers say they've developed a method of "pre-cooling" small office buildings, cutting energy consumption during times of peak demand.

The new procedure promises not only to save money, but also to help prevent power failures during hot summer days.

The method has been shown to reduce the cooling-related demand for electricity in small office buildings by 30 percent during hours of peak power consumption in California's sweltering summer climate.

James Braun, a Purdue University professor of mechanical engineering, says small office buildings represent the majority of commercial structures, so reducing power demand for air conditioning in such buildings could help prevent power-capacity problems such as those that plagued California during 2000 and 2001.

The research at Purdue's Ray Herrick Laboratories focused on California because the study was funded by the California Energy Commission, but Braun said the same demand-saving approach could be tailored to buildings in any state.

Findings will be detailed in three papers to be presented next Monday during the winter meeting of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers in Chicago.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Entrepreneurs to venture capitalists: Don't be a Scrooge

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Oak Ridge to acquire next generation supercomputer

Nov 14, 2014

The U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) has signed a contract with IBM to bring a next-generation supercomputer to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The OLCF's new ...

After Mars, India space chief aims for the moon

Nov 11, 2014

India now has its sights set on low-budget missions to land on the moon and study the sun after becoming the first country in Asia to reach Mars, the head of its space agency said Tuesday.

Science brings reason to duels over resources

Nov 03, 2014

Wars have been foretold in future scenarios where climate change and population pressures over-stress shared river resources. Scientists believe they can rewrite this grim prophecy.

Recommended for you

Passengers boarding airplanes—we're doing it wrong

2 hours ago

'Tis the season for airplane travel. We may be looking forward to getting where we're going, but most aspects of the travel itself are merely endured. There's stressful security, the madding crowd and the ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.