Study: Comedy films good for your heart

Jan 17, 2006

A University of Maryland study suggests watching comedy films boosts blood flow to the heart.

Researchers asked 20 healthy young adults to watch 15 to 30 minute segments of sad movies, such as the opening scene from "Saving Private Ryan," and humorous films such as "There's Something About Mary."

Researchers found brachial artery blood flow -- a good indicator of the body's blood flow -- was reduced in 14 of the 20 participants after watching movie clips that caused distress. But it was increased in 19 of the 20 participants after watching movie clips that elicited laughter. The difference in flow between sad and comedic films exceeded 50 percent.

The extent of the impact of watching a sad film was of the same magnitude as remembering episodes of anger and doing mental arithmetic, said the authors, while researchers said the impact of watching a funny film was equivalent to a bout of aerobic exercise or starting statin treatment.

The study is detailed in the journal Heart.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Fear of losing money, not spending habits, affects investor risk tolerance, study finds

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Microsoft unveils Xbox in China as it faces probe

2 hours ago

Microsoft on Wednesday unveiled its Xbox game console in China, the first to enter the market after an official ban 14 years ago, even as it faces a Chinese government probe over business practices.

Recommended for you

F1000Research brings static research figures to life

9 hours ago

F1000Research today published new research from Bjorn Brembs, professor of neurogenetics at the Institute of Zoology, Universitaet Regensburg, in Germany, with a proof-of-concept figure allowing readers and reviewers to run ...

How science can beat the flawed metric that rules it

11 hours ago

In order to improve something, we need to be able to measure its quality. This is true in public policy, in commercial industries, and also in science. Like other fields, science has a growing need for quantitative ...

User comments : 0