Beef may overtake seafood in Japan

May 24, 2007

A government fisheries report says beef consumption may soon surpass seafood in Japan.

The report says high prices for seafood -- spurred by strong demand in China and elsewhere -- and a growing taste for meat is making beef a more popular choice, Kyodo News said Wednesday.

Seafood purchases have been on a downward trend since 1965, while meat consumption has doubled in that time.

A survey by the Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Finance Corp. said 70 percent of Japanese housewives in their 30s do not fillet fish and 10 percent do not grill it.

Seafood consumption is rising in China, Europe and the United States, leading to higher seafood prices and reduced purchases by Japanese importers, the news service said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Will rapprochement mean new research collaborations between Cuba and the U.S.?

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Impoverished North Korea falls back on cyber weapons

3 hours ago

As one of the world's most impoverished powers, North Korea would struggle to match America's military or economic might, but appears to have settled on a relatively cheap method to torment its foe.

Five ways to make your email safer in case of a hack attack

3 hours ago

The Sony hack, the latest in a wave of company security breaches, exposed months of employee emails. Other hacks have given attackers access to sensitive information about a company and its customers, such as credit-card ...

Recommended for you

Study: Alcatraz inmates could have survived escape

Dec 17, 2014

The three prisoners who escaped from Alcatraz in one of the most famous and elaborate prison breaks in U.S. history could have survived and made it to land, scientists concluded in a recent study.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.