Anti-cancer gene: not what it was thought

May 21, 2007

U.S. scientists say a gene thought to be essential in helping chemotherapy kill cancer cells, might actually help them thrive.

In a study of chemo patients, scientists at the Georgia Institute of Technology and the Ovarian Cancer Institute found 70 percent of people whose tumors had mutations in the gene p53 were still alive after five years. Patients with normal p53 displayed only a 30 percent survival rate.

The scientists said those findings raise the possibility of a new strategy for fighting cancer -- namely, developing drugs to disable the functioning of that gene in the tumors of patients undergoing chemotherapy.

The study's results appear in the May 16 edition of the journal PLoS ONE.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: MR spectroscopy shows precancerous breast changes in women with BRCA gene

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Life-saving train design is rarely used

46 minutes ago

(AP)—Nearly a decade ago, the U.S. secretary of transportation stood at the site of a horrendous commuter train crash near downtown Los Angeles and called for the adoption of a new train car design that ...

Climate change may flatten famed surfing waves

1 hour ago

On a summer day in 1885, three Hawaiian princes surfed at the mouth of the San Lorenzo River on crudely constructed boards made from coastal redwoods, bringing the sport to the North American mainland.

Recommended for you

US women's awareness of breast density varies

12 hours ago

Disparities in the level of awareness and knowledge of breast density exist among U.S. women, according to the results of a Mayo Clinic study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Study shows why some brain cancers resist treatment

12 hours ago

Scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center may have discovered why some brain cancer patients develop resistance to standard treatments including radiation and the chemotherapy agent temozolomide.

Researchers identify genes responsible for lung tumors

14 hours ago

The lung transcription factor Nkx2-1 is an important gene regulating lung formation and normal respiratory functions after birth. Alterations in the expression of this transcription factor can lead to diseases such as lung ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.