Viagra sales don't meet expectations

May 20, 2007

While sales of erectile dysfunction drugs like Viagra have been steady since their release, their popularity has not met expectations, the Miami Herald said.

The newspaper Saturday reported while initial annual sales estimates for Viagra alone were around $5 billion, the total sales of the top three erectile medications have totaled $3 billion a year.

While sales of the drugs have been somewhat disappointing, they have been credited by some with making erectile dysfunction a less embarrassing medical condition.

"Before Viagra, a lot of men with erection problems were angry and withdrawn in their relationships," sex counselor Dr. Judy Kuriansky said. "They didn't want sex; their partners didn't know what was going on; the women blamed themselves, and it was a mess."

The Herald said that failure of the drug to work for all men may be behind the medication's lack of success as erections only occur in two out of three men when the problem has an organic basis.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Expression of privilege in vaccine refusal

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Zambia lifts ban on safari hunting

26 minutes ago

Zambia has lifted a 20-month ban on safari hunting because it has lost too much revenue, but lions and leopards will remain protected, the government said Wednesday.

Recommended for you

Expression of privilege in vaccine refusal

3 hours ago

Not all students returning to school this month will be up to date on their vaccinations. A new study conducted by Jennifer Reich, a researcher at the University of Colorado Denver, shows that the reasons why children may ...

Using computers to design drugs

Aug 22, 2014

Designing a new medicine is an expensive and time consuming business. Typically it takes around $2 billion and ten years for a new drug to move from its initial design in the lab, to the clinic. All the ...

Lilly psoriasis drug fares well in late-stage test

Aug 22, 2014

Drugmaker Eli Lilly and Co. said its potential psoriasis treatment fared better than both a fake drug and a competitor's product during late-stage testing on patients with the most common form of the skin disease.

User comments : 0