Science retracts cloning articles

Jan 13, 2006

The journal Science has retracted two articles by discredited South Korean scientist who claimed production of a stem-cell line from a cloned human embryo.

An investigation of South Korean scientist Hwang Woo-suk has concluded evidence supported both papers had been faked.

"Because the final report of the SNU (Seoul National University) investigation indicated that a significant amount of the data presented in both papers is fabricated, the editors of Science feel that an immediate and unconditional retraction of both papers is needed," the journal said in a statement.

"We therefore retract these two papers and advise the scientific community that the results reported in them are deemed to be invalid."

The scientist gave a public apology for the fabrications Thursday and asked South Koreans for their forgiveness, the BBC reported Friday.

The scientist has insisted that most of the fabrications were conducted by scientists on his research team without his knowledge, but he would take responsibility for the errors.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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