Craigslist to Add Ccube Click-to-Call

May 15, 2007

Ccube pinged us this afternoon to let us know that popular Web classified site Craigslist.org will add Ccube's click-to-call VOIP technology beginning on Tuesday.

Click-to-call is big business; it's one of the reasons eBay acquired Skype . Put simply, it's a technology that allows you, a user, to contact a seller via HTTP and a VOIP connection. Skype added click-to-call features last November.

The interesting thing about the Ccube service is that Ccube is touting it as part and parcel of Craigslist's anonymity system. The VOIP link serves as a sort of double-blind mediator, hiding both contact numbers from each other, but allowing both parties to talk.

The difference between Ccube and Skype is the financial aspect, however. Skype-to-Skype calls are always free; Ccube charges a flat fee, although the first 30 minutes per month are always free. From there, it's a flat fee of $7 up to 250 minutes, and then $20 for 1,000 minutes per month.

Copyright 2007 by Ziff Davis Media, Distributed by United Press International

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