FDA: Stop using 'True Man' or 'Energy Max'

May 10, 2007

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a warning Thursday, advising consumers not to purchase or use "True Man" or "Energy Max" products.

Both products, sold as dietary supplements nationwide, are touted as sexual enhancement products and treatments for erectile dysfunction. But the FDA said the products contain potentially harmful, undeclared ingredients.

Specifically, the FDA said the products contain substances called analogs that have structures similar to active ingredients in approved prescription drugs.

The government agency said consumers should discontinue use of both True Man and Energy Max products since it has not approved either and, therefore, their safety and effectiveness have not been established.

Dr. Steven Galson, director of the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said the undeclared analogs in True Man and Energy Max might interact with nitrates found in some prescription drugs, such as nitroglycerin and medications used to treat diabetes, high cholesterol and heart disease.

Both products are distributed and packed by America True Man Health Inc. of West Covina, Calif.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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