Scientists Work on Encyclopedia of Life

May 08, 2007 By SETH BORENSTEIN, AP Science Writer

(AP) -- In a whale-sized project, the world's scientists plan to compile everything they know about all of Earth's 1.8 million known species and put it all on one Web site, open to everyone.



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