Warming climate gives gardens a makeover

May 04, 2007

U.S. gardeners say the only upside to global warming is a longer growing season and the chance to grow palm trees and subtropical plants.

Climate change has already moved many areas of the United States up by one or more plant-hardiness zones, The New York Times said Thursday.

Horticulturists warn that warmer temperatures help weeds and invasive species too. Poison ivy becomes more toxic and ragweed dumps more pollen, the newspaper said. Kudzu is creeping northward.

A report released last month by the National Wildlife Federation says that by the end of the century, the climate will no longer be favorable for the official state tree or flower in 28 states, the newspaper said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Study casts doubt on climate benefit of biofuels from corn residue

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