Pioneer Announced Blu-ray Disc Combination Drive

May 02, 2007

Pioneer Electronics today announces the BDC-2202, a robust Blu-ray Disc computer drive, which will be available to consumers beginning next month for a suggested price of $299.

The Pioneer Blu-ray Disc combination drive allows users to playback new high definition Blu-ray Disc film titles as well as read and write digital content to DVD and CD, fulfilling their storage and entertainment needs.

The drive can read BD-ROM/BD-R/BD-RE at up to 5X and can read BD-ROM (DL) and BD-R/-RE (DL) at up to 2X speed.

It comes bundled with media software that ensures compatibility with commercially released Blu-ray Disc movies. It also allows users to create personal DVD movies and digital photo slideshows, securely backup personal data and media files to DVD or CD, and create and burn favorite music to CD. The software also offers a Direct-to-Disc feature allowing aspiring filmmakers to capture movies directly from the camcorder to DVD without the inconvenience of using vital hard drive space.

“With the BDC-2202, computer savvy consumers are now privy to what was previously only available to professional users. In addition to maintaining the same benefits of current optical disc drives, the included software means users can now enjoy their favorite Blu-ray Disc movies as well as their own personal disc creations,” said Andy Parsons, senior vice president at Pioneer Electronics (USA) Inc.

With copious amounts of storage capacity, Blu-ray Disc can hold high definition video and audio content along with advanced interactive features and extensive bonus materials on a single disc. With the BDC-2202, Blu-ray Disc fans and audio video enthusiasts have the capability to view recently released movies directly on a computer for times when they are not in a home theater environment.

According to Home Media Magazine, Blu-ray Disc film titles have accounted for more than half of the 2.4 million HD discs sold.

Pioneer has been an innovator of optical disc technology since it brought LaserDisc, the precursor to DVD, to market in 1980.

Source: Pioneer

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