Man versus goats in Galapagos

May 01, 2007

Grants from private donors and the United Nations are helping rangers at the Galapagos National Park in Ecuador turn the tide of the war against goats.

Private donors have given about $10 million and the United Nations has provided support for a program designed by park officials and the Charles Darwin Foundation to drive the non-native species out of the park, The New York Times reported Thursday.

The struggle, which has dragged on for decades, was sparked by concerns that the invading goats harm the local ecosystem by hogging the food source required by native species, such as tortoises.

"Sometimes we have to kill one animal so that others can survive," said Alonso Carrion, a ranger at Galapagos National Park.

The rangers have armed themselves with .223-caliber rifles, exploding bullets, telescopic sights, two-way radios and nylon nets and have hired helicopter pilots from New Zealand to get them close enough to thin the goat herds.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Pollution linked to lethal sea turtle tumors

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Asian stars enlisted to fight African rhino poaching

Sep 19, 2014

Increasingly desperate South African conversationists are turning to a multi-national team of "rhino ambassadors" to try to end the scourge of poaching—and Vietnamese pop diva Hong Nhung has been recruited ...

Recommended for you

Protected areas offer glimmers of hope for wildlife

1 hour ago

National parks and other protected areas offer hope for threatened species at a time of plunging wildlife numbers, conservationist group WWF said Tuesday, but their success has not been universal.

User comments : 0