Researchers: Polar bears ingesting toxins

Jan 10, 2006

Researchers say that toxic chemicals from flame retardants are building up in the tissues of polar bears.

An international group of wildlife scientists have found that chemicals in the retardants are carried north from the United States by the wind. In the Arctic, they become increasingly concentrated in the fatty tissues of animals as they move up the food chain, the Los Angeles Times reports.

Polar bears are also threatened by the melting of Arctic sea ice. The bears are, in some respects, marine mammals, dependent on the ice to get them close to seals, their major food source.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: New branch added to European family tree

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

A cold case heats up again

Sep 10, 2014

Twenty-five years ago, a U of A professor together with a newly minted alumnus, John Geiger, '81 BA, published Frozen in Time, a shocking and influential account of the Franklin expedition's disastrous final ...

PCBs levels down in Norwegian polar bears

Mar 29, 2012

It's never been easy to be a polar bear. They may have to go months without eating. Their preferred food, seal, requires enormous luck and patience to catch. Add to that the melting of Arctic sea ice due to climate change, ...

Polar bears ill from accumulated environmental toxins

Oct 13, 2011

New doctoral thesis documents that industrial chemicals are transported from the industrialized world to the Arctic via air and sea currents. Here, the cocktail of environmental toxins is absorbed by the sea's food chains ...

Recommended for you

User comments : 0