Newspapers Debate Online Reader Comments

Apr 26, 2007 By TRAVIS LOLLER, Associated Press Writer

(AP) -- Faced with declining circulation, many U.S. newspapers are trying to engage readers by allowing them to respond to news stories online. But the anonymity of the Internet lets readers post obscenities and racist hate speech that would never be allowed in the printed paper.



Content from The Associated Press expires 15 days after original publication date. For more information about The Associated Press, please visit www.ap.org .

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