Government patents diesel fuel technology

Apr 24, 2007

An innovative methodology developed by U.S. government scientists might help speed reformulated diesel fuels to market.

The U.S. Department of Energy recently patented the reformulation technology developed at its Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The reformulated fuels are expected to result in less air pollution, while saving consumers an estimated $3.6 billion during the expected 12-year product impact period.

The researchers said their patented technique, called Principal Components Regression Plus, overcomes problems inherent in other emissions predictive techniques that do not take into account real-world conditions.

ORNL scientists said the methodology has helped identify reformulated diesel fuels that provide significantly reduced emissions of nitrogen oxides and particulate matter relative to commercially available diesel fuels. The fuels can also improve vehicle operating characteristics, the government scientists said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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