Briefs: Google remains most popular search engine

Jan 06, 2006

Google remains the most popular Internet search engine, according to a report Friday.

The comScore Networks group, which specializes in surveying consumer behavior, found that Google garnered the most searches in November with 2.05 billion searches, followed by Yahoo! with 1.52 billion searches. MSN-Microsoft came in at third place with 728.8 million searches.

Overall, about 5.15 billion searches were made online by U.S. users that month, up 9 percent from the same month a year ago.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Solar Impulse departs Myanmar for China

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