Briefs: Kodak, Motorola ink deal on mobile imaging

Jan 06, 2006

Motorola and Kodak Friday entered a cross-licensing and marketing alliance in mobile imaging.

The deal will improve the photo qualities and ease of use of camera phones, the companies said. The collaboration covers licensing, sourcing, software integration and marketing, and extends to co-development of image-rich devices with joint engineering teams.

Motorola Chairman Ed Zander said the alliance will enhance photo sharing as well as the development and delivery of mobile images.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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