Joost Accepts Blame For Outages

Apr 20, 2007

Comcast this week denied message board rumors that it was blocking access to Internet-based TV service Joost, claiming that issues faced by consumers were likely the result of a Joost service upgrade.

Earlier this month, perplexed Internet users reported on Joost's message boards that they were unable to view video content. The exchange led some to speculate that telecom provider Comcast was at fault, as a majority of those affected were Comcast subscribers.

The issue found its way to community-based Web site Digg, where several other Comcast users complained about lost service before subscribers who had not lost service came out of the woodwork to downplay the accusations.

Comcast denied a Joost intervention. "Comcast is not blocking access to Joost in any way, and our customers should have no problem accessing the beta application on its site," said Jennifer Khoury, a Comcast spokeswoman.

Users who experienced a service interruption were likely operating with a previous version of Joost, according to Joost chief technology officer Dirk-Willem van Gulik.

In an e-mail to users, van Gulik said "we've got a new Joost version 0.9.2 ready for you, as your old 0.9.1 is no longer working."

Joost uses SSL technology and "once every other year or so, these certificates need to be renewed," said van Gulik. When that time came, "we did not realize that we had a copy hardwired into the 0.9.1 client by accident. Our apologies for this, but this is all part of being a beta."

In an April 11 blog post , Joost also said it had encountered problems mixing its P2P and traditional HTTP traffic. The company is working to improve "the interaction with the other back-end services," the post said. "This means that some viewers will get errors when trying to view some shows, which is regrettable, but … that now means that we can work on fixing it, which we are doing."

Copyright 2007 by Ziff Davis Media, Distributed by United Press International

Explore further: Turkey still hopes Twitter will open local office

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Intel and Yahoo! to Bring the Internet to Television

Aug 20, 2008

Intel Corporation and Yahoo! Inc. today previewed plans for the Widget Channel, a television (TV) application framework optimized for TV and related consumer electronics (CE) devices that use the Intel Architecture. The Widget ...

Recommended for you

Net neutrality balancing act

6 hours ago

Researchers in Italy, writing in the International Journal of Technology, Policy and Management have demonstrated that net neutrality benefits content creator and consumers without compromising provider innovation nor pr ...

Twitter rules out Turkey office amid tax row

Apr 16, 2014

Social networking company Twitter on Wednesday rejected demands from the Turkish government to open an office there, following accusations of tax evasion and a two-week ban on the service.

How does false information spread online?

Apr 16, 2014

Last summer the World Economic Forum (WEF) invited its 1,500 council members to identify top trends facing the world, including what should be done about them. The WEF consists of 80 councils covering a wide range of issues including social media. Members come ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Tiny power plants hold promise for nuclear energy

Small underground nuclear power plants that could be cheaper to build than their behemoth counterparts may herald the future for an energy industry under intense scrutiny since the Fukushima disaster, the ...

Clean air: Fewer sources for self-cleaning

Up to now, HONO, also known as nitrous acid, was considered one of the most important sources of hydroxyl radicals (OH), which are regarded as the detergent of the atmosphere, allowing the air to clean itself. ...

Turning off depression in the brain

Scientists have traced vulnerability to depression-like behaviors in mice to out-of-balance electrical activity inside neurons of the brain's reward circuit and experimentally reversed it – but there's ...