Proteins important in Alzheimer's, Parkinson's disease travel in the slow lane

Apr 17, 2007
Proteins important in Alzheimer's, Parkinson's disease travel in the slow lane
Slow transport protein alpha-synuclein moving along an axon (arrowheads mark movement). Credit: Subhojit Roy, MD, PhD, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Using a novel video-imaging system, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have been able to observe proteins important in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease moving along axons, extensions of nerve cells that carry proteins away from the cell body. Understanding this process of axonal transport is important for studying many neurodegenerative diseases. The study appeared in the Journal of Neuroscience.

Axonal transport often breaks down and many neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by defects in this process. Of particular interest is a group of transported proteins called slow component-b that includes synuclein and tau, disease proteins involved in Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease, respectively, in addition to many other proteins critical for axonal growth and regeneration.

"There are two basic transport groups called fast and slow components, with a 200 to 300 fold difference in average velocities," says first author Subhojit Roy, MD, PhD, a neuropathologist and Research Associate in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine. "While scientists have seen proteins in the fast component move rapidly to the tip of the axon, until now, mechanisms of the slow movement of these disease-related proteins have been unclear as their transport had not been directly visualized."

Roy devised a system to simultaneously visualize the transport of two labeled slow-component-b proteins in living cultured mouse axons. This clarified unique aspects of slow-protein transport. He found that the "slow" proteins actually showed rapid bursts of movement followed by pauses. This intermittent transport behavior of individual cargoes made the overall population slow and suggests that fast and slow proteins use the same basic mechanisms for transport.

Surprisingly, the videos also revealed that multiple slow proteins are transported together as "packets," essentially piggy-backing on each other, possibly on the same specialized proteins called molecular motors. "It makes sense when you think about it – why would the neurons spend so much energy transporting proteins separately when they’re going to the same place anyway, like car pooling" speculates Roy.

"Our study reveals novel aspects of axonal transport of an important class of proteins, namely the slow component-b proteins, and also opens up new avenues for investigating axonal transport defects in neurodegenerative diseases," concludes Roy.

Source: University of Pennsylvania

Explore further: Sierra Leone faces criticism over Ebola shutdown

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Separation of para and ortho water

19 minutes ago

(Phys.org) —Not all water is equal—at least not at the molecular level. There are two versions of the water molecule, para and ortho water, in which the spin states of the hydrogen nuclei are different. ...

Dogs can be pessimists too

29 minutes ago

Dogs generally seem to be cheerful, happy-go-lucky characters, so you might expect that most would have an optimistic outlook on life.

Recommended for you

Sierra Leone reaches final day of Ebola lockdown

2 hours ago

Frustrated residents complained of food shortages in some neighborhoods of Sierra Leone's capital on Sunday as the country reached the third and final day of a sweeping, unprecedented lockdown designed to ...

Sierra Leone faces criticism over Ebola shutdown

Sep 20, 2014

Sierra Leone began the second day of a 72-hour nationwide shutdown aimed at containing the spread of the deadly Ebola virus on Saturday amid criticism that the action was a poorly planned publicity stunt.

Presence of peers ups health workers' hand hygiene

Sep 19, 2014

(HealthDay)—The presence of other health care workers improves hand hygiene adherence, according to a study published in the October issue of Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology.

Sierra Leone streets deserted as shutdown begins

Sep 19, 2014

Sierra Leone's normally chaotic capital resembled a ghost town on Friday as residents were confined to their homes for the start of a three-day lockdown aimed at halting the deadly Ebola epidemic.

User comments : 0