Glass baby bottle use rising in California

Apr 09, 2007

Stores in California cities such as San Francisco are having a hard time dealing with a sudden resurgence in the use of baby bottles made of glass.

Linked to recent reports of the possible toxicity of certain plastic baby bottles by a state advocacy group, sales of the glass versions have raised dramatically in recent months, The San Francisco Chronicle said.

San Francisco resident Sean Mullins said that while manufacturers maintain their plastic products are indeed safe, he chose to embrace caution after hearing of Environment California's "Toxic Baby Bottles" report.

"You want to avoid anything that could be a health risk to a baby," the father of a 6-month-old told the Chronicle. "You try to give them the best start."

The paper said that certain types of plastic bottles were allegedly found to leak bisphenol A, a chemical that had been found to be dangerous to lab animals, when the baby items were heated up.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Physician/Pharmacist model can improve mean BP

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Chitosan, a sustainable alternative for food packaging

Jan 09, 2015

Riverbanks and oceans are full of plastic; there are bits of this material in the organism of a large number of fish, etc. Packaging and wrappers made from petroleum by-products are seriously damaging the ...

Plastics component affects intestine: study

Dec 14, 2009

The chemical Bisphenol A used in plastic containers and drinks cans has been shown for the first time to affect the functioning of the intestines, according to a French study published Monday.

Recommended for you

Physician/Pharmacist model can improve mean BP

Mar 27, 2015

(HealthDay)—A physician/pharmacist collaborative model can improve mean blood pressure (BP), according to a study published online March 24 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Innovative prototype presented for post-ICU patients

Mar 27, 2015

(HealthDay)—A collaborative care model, the Critical Care Recovery Center (CCRC), represents an innovative prototype aimed to improve the quality of life of intensive care unit (ICU) survivors, according ...

Clues to a city's health may be found in its sewage

Mar 27, 2015

Research from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee suggests that sampling a city's sewage can tell scientists a great deal about its residents – and may someday lead to improvements in public health.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.