Manatees Could Lose 'Endangered' Status

Apr 09, 2007
Manatees Could Lose 'Endangered' Status (AP)
In this Jan. 5, 2006, file photo, manatees swim at Blue Springs State Park in Orange City, Fla. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service might reclassify the manatee as threatened instead of endangered, a move suggesting the marine mammal has rebounded from the brink of extinction, according to an internal memo obtained by The Washington Post. (AP Photo/John Raoux)

(AP) -- The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service might reclassify the manatee as threatened instead of endangered, a move suggesting the marine mammal has rebounded from the brink of extinction, according to an internal memo obtained by The Washington Post.



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