Antibiotics found to increasingly fail

Apr 09, 2007

Pediatricians in the United States are increasingly finding that antibiotics are not always ideal for treating ear infections, a report says.

The Denver Post reported on the findings, which are significant to pediatricians -- children are highly susceptible to ear infections.

Antibiotics are typically prescribed right away to patients with ear infections, but doctors have reported on an increase in patients and parents who report that these medications have failed to relieve the infection.

Patricia Yoon, a pediatric ear, nose and throat specialist at The Children's Hospital in Denver told the Post that this is cause for real concern because ear infections account for about one-fourth of all antibiotics prescribed in the United States. Yoon said she thinks an increasing number of strains of resistant bacteria are emerging.

But the problem has also been seen beyond ear infections. The Post reported that the antibiotic erythromycin, which fights off skin infections, was shown to work 71 percent of the time in 1996. By 2001, the drug was reportedly effective only 46 percent of the time.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: FDA approves second vaccine against meningitis strain

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Study: Diabetes drug affecting fish in Lake Michigan

Jan 16, 2015

Researchers have found that pharmaceuticals and personal-care byproducts persist at low levels miles from sewage discharge pipes in Lake Michigan. And a study from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee shows that the most ...

Recommended for you

Medical charity warns India over patent rules

Jan 21, 2015

Doctors without Borders on Wednesday warned the Indian government not to bow to US pressure to amend patent regulations that allow millions access to affordable medicines, ahead of a visit by President Barack Obama.

Why are some generic drugs getting so expensive?

Jan 21, 2015

More than eight out of every 10 prescriptions dispensed in the US is generic. This growth is due to a large number of top-selling drugs going off patent over the past decade, as well as innovations in t ...

Supreme Court sides with Teva in drug dispute

Jan 20, 2015

The Supreme Court on Tuesday sided with Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. in the company's high-profile patent dispute with rival firms over the top-selling multiple sclerosis drug.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.