Researchers Catalog More Than 1M Species

Apr 08, 2007 By RANDOLPH E. SCHMID, AP Science Writer

(AP) -- A worldwide scientific effort to catalog every living species has topped the 1 million milestone. Six years into the program the total has reached 1,009,000, researchers report. They hope to complete the listing by 2011, reaching an expected total of about 1.75 million species.



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