Tequila plant may provide colon relief

Mar 29, 2007

Researchers in Mexico say compounds from the fruit used to make tequila may provide a more effective way to treat diseases of the colon.

Chemists at the University of Guadalajara say compounds in blue agave may be more effective at delivering drugs to the colon than current methods and could lead to improved treatments for ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel syndrome, cancer and Crohn's disease, the American Chemical Society said in a release.

Many drugs are destroyed by stomach acids before they can reach the colon but the tequila compounds, a class of polysaccharides known as fructans, resist destruction in the stomach and could allow more of the drugs to reach the colon intact.

"This study shows that the agave fruit is good for more than just tequila. It also has medicinal value," said study leader Guillermo Toriz, Ph.D., an assistant professor at the university.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: A new approach to creating organic zeolites

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Shark sightings off Cape Cod a boon for tourism

12 minutes ago

Growing sightings of great white sharks off Cape Cod are generating business for local entrepreneurs at a popular vacation spot where the supreme predators lurk offshore.

Verizon boosts FiOS uploads to match downloads

40 minutes ago

Verizon is boosting the upload speeds of nearly all its FiOS connections to match the download speeds, vastly shortening the time it takes for subscribers to send videos and back up their files online.

As numbers of gray seals rise, so do conflicts

14 hours ago

(AP)—Decades after gray seals were all but wiped out in New England waters, the population has rebounded so much that some frustrated residents are calling for a controlled hunt.

Recommended for you

A new approach to creating organic zeolites

41 minutes ago

Yushan Yan, Distinguished Professor of Engineering at the University of Delaware, is known worldwide for using nanomaterials to solve problems in energy engineering, environmental sustainability and electronics.

A tree may have the answers to renewable energy

20 hours ago

Through an energy conversion process that mimics that of a tree, a University of Wisconsin-Madison materials scientist is making strides in renewable energy technologies for producing hydrogen.

User comments : 0