Year's final space launch completed

Dec 29, 2005

The last space launch of this year was completed when a Russian Proton M rocket took off from Baikonur Cosmodrome, carrying a U.S. satellite.

The satellite, launched Wednesday, will relay broadband communications to specially equipped jetliners flying across the Pacific Ocean, reports Space.com.

The launch was to have taken off Dec. 5 but was delayed because of a problem in the vehicle's control system. Within minutes into the flight, the three stages that made up the Proton "core vehicle" completed their systematic firings and dropped away, the report said.

That put the Breeze M and attached AMERICOM 23 spacecraft on a suborbital trajectory.

This is the seventh Proton mission of the year and the vehicle's 318th flight in four decades, the report said.

New Jersey-based SES AMERICOM will operate the satellite during its 16-year design life. The craft, built in France by Alcatel Alenia Space, will allow aircraft passengers to use laptop computers to check e-mail and access the Internet with high-speed links.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Kazakh satellite to be launched into orbit

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Alan Guth on new insights into the 'Big Bang'

Mar 20, 2014

Earlier this week, scientists announced that a telescope observing faint echoes of the so-called "Big Bang" had found evidence of the universe's nearly instantaneous expansion from a mere dot into a dense ...

Scientists illuminate cause of sun's 'perfect storm'

Mar 18, 2014

In a paper published today in Nature Communications, an international team of scientists, including three from the University of New Hampshire's Space Science Center, uncovers the origin and cause of an ...

Russia launches navigation satellites

Nov 04, 2011

Russia on Friday successfully launched three satellites for its global navigation system Glonass on a Proton-M rocket from its Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, the Russian space agency said.

Recommended for you

Kazakh satellite to be launched into orbit

1 hour ago

Kazakhstan's first-ever Earth observation satellite is to be fired into orbit next week from the European spaceport in Kourou in French Guiana, launch company Arianespace said.

Habitable exoplanets are bad news for humanity

4 hours ago

Last week, scientists announced the discovery of Kepler-186f, a planet 492 light years away in the Cygnus constellation. Kepler-186f is special because it marks the first planet almost exactly the same size as Earth ...

Professional and amateur astronomers join forces

5 hours ago

(Phys.org) —Long before the term "citizen science" was coined, the field of astronomy has benefited from countless men and women who study the sky in their spare time. These amateur astronomers devote hours ...

First-of-its-kind NASA space-weather project

20 hours ago

A NASA scientist is launching a one-to-two-year pilot project this summer that takes advantage of U.S. high-voltage power transmission lines to measure a phenomenon that has caused widespread power outages ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Kazakh satellite to be launched into orbit

Kazakhstan's first-ever Earth observation satellite is to be fired into orbit next week from the European spaceport in Kourou in French Guiana, launch company Arianespace said.

Habitable exoplanets are bad news for humanity

Last week, scientists announced the discovery of Kepler-186f, a planet 492 light years away in the Cygnus constellation. Kepler-186f is special because it marks the first planet almost exactly the same size as Earth ...

Professional and amateur astronomers join forces

(Phys.org) —Long before the term "citizen science" was coined, the field of astronomy has benefited from countless men and women who study the sky in their spare time. These amateur astronomers devote hours ...

First-of-its-kind NASA space-weather project

A NASA scientist is launching a one-to-two-year pilot project this summer that takes advantage of U.S. high-voltage power transmission lines to measure a phenomenon that has caused widespread power outages ...

Cell resiliency surprises scientists

New research shows that cells are more resilient in taking care of their DNA than scientists originally thought. Even when missing critical components, cells can adapt and make copies of their DNA in an alternative ...