Year's final space launch completed

Dec 29, 2005

The last space launch of this year was completed when a Russian Proton M rocket took off from Baikonur Cosmodrome, carrying a U.S. satellite.

The satellite, launched Wednesday, will relay broadband communications to specially equipped jetliners flying across the Pacific Ocean, reports Space.com.

The launch was to have taken off Dec. 5 but was delayed because of a problem in the vehicle's control system. Within minutes into the flight, the three stages that made up the Proton "core vehicle" completed their systematic firings and dropped away, the report said.

That put the Breeze M and attached AMERICOM 23 spacecraft on a suborbital trajectory.

This is the seventh Proton mission of the year and the vehicle's 318th flight in four decades, the report said.

New Jersey-based SES AMERICOM will operate the satellite during its 16-year design life. The craft, built in France by Alcatel Alenia Space, will allow aircraft passengers to use laptop computers to check e-mail and access the Internet with high-speed links.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP Satellite team ward off recent space debris threat

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

'Twisted rope' clue to dangerous solar storms

3 hours ago

A "twisted rope" of magnetically-charged energy precedes solar storms that have the potential to damage satellites and electricity grids, French scientists said on Wednesday.

POLARBEAR seeks cosmic answers in microwave polarization

Oct 21, 2014

An international team of physicists has measured a subtle characteristic in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation that will allow them to map the large-scale structure of the universe, ...

How gamma ray telescopes work

Sep 22, 2014

Yesterday I talked about the detection of gamma ray bursts, intense blasts of gamma rays that occasionally appear in distant galaxies. Gamma ray bursts were only detected when gamma ray satellites were put ...

How hostile is space?

Aug 06, 2014

Space may seem calm, but it is a more hostile environment than that on Earth. Invisible radiation is a big problem for space enthusiasts and scientific instruments. Substituting electronic devices to do human ...

Recommended for you

'Twisted rope' clue to dangerous solar storms

11 hours ago

A "twisted rope" of magnetically-charged energy precedes solar storms that have the potential to damage satellites and electricity grids, French scientists said on Wednesday.

User comments : 0