Rome Show Features Ancient Perfumes

Mar 27, 2007 By MARTA FALCONI, Associated Press Writer
Rome Show Features Ancient Perfumes (AP)
A view of glass containers on display at the Capitoline Museums, part of an exhibit of four perfumes recreated by a team of archaeologists from 14 original fragrances dating to 4,000 years ago, Wednesday March 21, 2007. Digging in the Pyrgos-Mavroraki site, some 90 kilometers (56 miles) southwest of Nicosia, Cyprus, turned up a complex archaeologists believe was used as a perfume lab. The exhibit is designed to offer the rare chance to smell the scent of ancient history - typically a mix of natural spices and olive oil - featuring fragrances from the world's oldest known perfume factory. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

(AP) -- It's a rare chance to smell the scent of ancient history - typically a mix of natural spices and olive oil - thanks to an exhibit in Rome featuring fragrances from the world's oldest known perfume factory.



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