Smoot donates Nobel prize money to charity

Mar 23, 2007

University Of California-Berkeley astrophysicist George Smoot is donating his Nobel Prize money to a charitable fund for science education.

The Nobel prize was worth about $1.4 million, the Oakland Tribune said.

Smoot, a physics professor at Berkeley and an astrophysicist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, is the second Nobel prize winner from the university to convert his prize money into a donor-advised fund at the $270 million East Bay Community Foundation.

Smoot's charitable fund will go to further science education and training by funding fellowships for graduate and postdoctoral students, the newspaper said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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