Why is long-term therapy required to cure tuberculosis?

Mar 20, 2007

Understanding why other bacteria become resistant to antibiotics could hold the key to understanding why TB takes so long to cure, say researchers in a policy paper in PLoS Medicine.

Patients with TB typically have to take 4 antibiotics for 2 months and then continue 2 of these antibiotics for an additional 4 months. Why is such long treatment needed?

Lalita Ramakrishnan (University of Washington) and colleagues say that traditionally the answer was thought to lie in the fact that the tuberculosis microbe achieves a TB-specific "dormant" or non-replicating state in an infected person. Because virtually all types of antibiotics act only on replicating bacteria, the dormant state of TB is thought to render it resistant to treatment.

But the authors now challenge this traditional view. In the light of data on treating human TB and other bacterial infections, they suggest that the non-replicating state is not TB-specific and that the number of non-replicating bacteria correlates with total bacterial burden rather than TB-specific pathology.

"This correlation between bacterial burden and time to cure is not unique to TB, as it has been found in other bacterial infections, both acute and chronic," they say.

Understanding and countering the ways in which bacteria in general (rather than TB specifically) become resistant to antibiotics, say Ramakrishnan and colleagues, "may hold the key to reducing the duration of treatment of all recalcitrant bacterial infections, including TB."

Source: Public Library of Science

Explore further: A better way to track emerging cell therapies using MRIs

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

New insights in survival strategies of bacteria

Sep 14, 2014

Bacteria are particularly ingenious when it comes to survival strategies. They often create a biofilm to protect themselves from a hostile environment, for example during treatment with antibiotics. A biofilm is a bacterial ...

'Immortal' flatworms may be a weapon against bacteria

Sep 11, 2014

A novel mode of defense against bacteria such as the causal agent of tuberculosis or Staphylococcus aureus has been identified in humans by studying a small, aquatic flatworm, the planarian. This discovery ...

How bacteria battle fluoride

Sep 11, 2014

He's not a dentist, but Christopher Miller is focused on fluoride. Two studies from his Brandeis University lab provide new insights into the mechanisms that allow bacteria to resist fluoride toxicity, information ...

Recommended for you

A better way to track emerging cell therapies using MRIs

13 hours ago

Cellular therapeutics – using intact cells to treat and cure disease – is a hugely promising new approach in medicine but it is hindered by the inability of doctors and scientists to effectively track the movements, destination ...

New biomedical implants accelerate bone healing

21 hours ago

A major success in developing new biomedical implants with the ability to accelerate bone healing has been reported by a group of scientists from the Department of Restorative Dentistry, University of Malaya. ...

User comments : 0